Shared Boundaries

Shared Boundaries

School:

UBC

Department:

Landscape Architecture

Course:

LARC 502

Instructors:

  • Fionn Byrne

City of Vancouver:

  • Andrea Wickham

Student Team:

  • Kelly Kang
  • Josh Fender

Strategy:

  • Climate Emergency Plan

City goal area:

  • Climate Leadership

Term:

Spring 2020

Summary

The fence signifies the property line between two neighbours; a separator between two private spaces. In Vancouver the high fence may also serve as a symbol of social isolation and social disconnection. Our project “Shared Boundaries” challenges this narrative through an integration of a shared planter box fence. 

This fence system speculates how food, water, and waste management could be shared among neighbours, with the goal of connecting the community at large. Through the introduction of a shared water/food/waste system along the fence line, neighbours can contribute to the sustainable goals of Vancouver’s Greenest City Action Plan. Neighbours can build stronger connections with one another as they work together to manage the system.

Rainwater is harvested from roof drains directly into the fence garden boxes. Water that surpasses a certain level in water tanks could then be automatically released to the garden boxes to irrigate the fruits and vegetables. In the backyard, a shared chicken coop was designed to encourage interactions and shared ownership between neighbours while providing essential proteins. Household food waste, organic waste from the fence garden and the chicken coop can be used for compost, and later being reused as fertilizers for the garden. 

The water/ food/waste system will encourage each neighbor to share costs, time, material usage, and storage spaces; both benefiting by increasing overall productivity and efficiency, while still maintaining privacy by adjusting the height of the fences. This results in economic, social, and environmental benefits through this reclamation of the fence line.